Pilots’ union urges FAA for new 737 MAX cockpit procedures

Boeing’s 737 MAX jet could return to commercial service as early as this year if it meets all required safety fixes. But the union representing American pilots has been quick to point out that in addition to those safety fixes, Boeing needs to do much more. RT America’s Trinity Chavez has the latest developments. Then former NTSB official Jamie Finch shares his expertise.

Indian airliner crashes & breaks in half

At least 14 people were killed in an Air India plane crash on Friday. Rick Sanchez breaks the news. Then former NTSB official Jamie Finch joins Rick Sanchez to share his expertise.

US senators say FAA chief ‘stonewalled’ Boeing probe

FAA chief Steve Dickson testified Wednesday before the US Senate Commerce Committee on the progress into investigating the “cozy” ties between the agency and aviation giant Boeing. Boeing’s 737 MAX jet was grounded in 2019 after two deadly crashes.

Boeing to begin testing new 737 MAX jet

A new report from the US government issued on Boeing’s 737 MAX jets confirms that the company suppressed information on changes to their MCAS software and didn’t submit certain documents to regulators. This comes during a push to re-certify the jets and get them back in the air. Former NTSB official Jamie Finch shares his expertise.

Are airlines doomed?

Jamie Finch, former director of Government, Public and Family Affairs for the NTSB, joins Rick Sanchez to weigh in on the airline industry’s struggle to adapt to new health concerns and drastic reduction in travel due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Flight attendants are scared — Are crowded planes safe?

Flight attendants are worried about a lack of safety regulations at airports and on planes that may be contributing to the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. RT America’s Natasha Sweatte reports. Then Jamie Finch, former director of Government, Public and Family Affairs for NTSB, joins Rick Sanchez to share his expertise.

New details have emerged from the investigation into a Moscow plane crash that killed 41 people in 2019

New details have emerged from the investigation into a Moscow plane crash that killed 41 people in 2019. Rick Sanchez reports. Then former director of Government, Public and Family Affairs at NTSB Jamie Finch shares his expertise. He also weighs in on the controversial bailout of major US airlines at taxpayer expense and the future of aircraft manufacturing giant Boeing.

How will the downturn will impact airlines

The global economic plunge is taking it’s toll on multiple industries all over the world. RT America’s Alex Mihailovich reports on how the downturn is impacting travel, retail, leisure and other sectors and how governments are responding. Then former director of Government, Public and Family Affairs for the National Transportation and Safety Board (NTSB) Jamie Finch shares his insights on how the downturn will impact airlines. #QuestionMore #RTAmerica #NewsWithRickSanchez

Culture of mistrust’ still surrounds Boeing

Will crash that killed Kobe be pinned on Lockheed Martin?

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is hard at work in Calabasas, California at the site of the deadly helicopter crash that killed NBA superstar Kobe Bryant, his daughter and 7 others. Former NTSB official Jamie Finch weighs in.

Missile hits Ukrainian airliner in midair over Iran

Jamie Finch, former director of Government, Public and Family Affairs for NTSB shares his insights.

Boeing faces $5M fine as former CEO departs with $62M

Boeing is now to be hit with a new set of fines as the FAA demand more than $5M for ‘substandard’ parts installed on the wings of 200 of its 737 Max jets. Former NTSB official Jamie Finch joins In Question to discuss the ongoing Boeing saga with RT America’s Manila Chan.

Questions we needed answered in Iran crash

https://thehill.com/hilltv/rising/477682-plane-crash-expert-questions-we-needed-answered-in-iran-crash?jwsource=cl

Today Jamie Finch appeared on http://Hill.TV to discuss the tragic Ukraine International Airlines plane crash that appears to have been caused by a surface-to-air missile strike. Independent professional investigators need to get on the crash scene immediately to gather evidence to prove that the plane was brought down by either a missile or a mechanical failure. #UkrainianPlaneCrash #IranPlaneCrash #Boeing737

Tehran plane crash kills 176

A Ukrainian Boeing 737 NG crashed in Iran shortly after takeoff from Imam Khomeini Airport in Tehran on Tuesday night. The crash killed all 176 people on board, 63 of whom were Canadian. RT America’s Sara Montes de Oca reports for News.Views.Hughes. Then RT America’s Alex Mihailovich reports on Canada’s reaction to the crash. Then Jamie Finch, former director of Government, Public and Family Affairs for the NTSB, shares his expertise.

Boeing’s stock has taken off following the resignation of its CEO on Monday, after months of turbulence. Could new leadership lead to a turnaround of the embattled aerospace giant? Former NTSB official Jamie Finch lends us a hand today to break down the move and what lies in store for Boeing.

Dennis Muilenburg has resigned as CEO of Boeing amid fallout from the grounding of the 737 MAX jets. Former Director of Government, Family and Planning Affairs at NTSB Jamie Finch joins In Question to discuss the implications.

Rick Sanchez talks to aviation expert Jamie Finch about the breaking news that Boeing will be halting production of their problematic 737 Max jetliner. Jamie discusses the decision itself and the coming economic fallout.

Rick Sanchez talks to Jamie Finch, former Director of GAPAFA at NTSB, about the Federal Aviation Authority knowing about the problems with Boeing’s 737 MAX before a deadly crash forced the plane out of operation.

Boeing is considering suspending production of any more Max 8 jets in the near future. Officials say that if approval for software fixes go into 2020 then they will have no other choice. Former NTSB official Jamie Finch joins In Question to discuss.

FAA Administrator Steve Dickson testifies Wednesday before Congress ahead of implementing a new certification process of Boeing’s infamous 737. Jamie Finch, former National Transportation Safety Board official, weighs in.

Why the FAA has taken over the certifying process for all new Boeing 737 Max aircraft

Former NTSB director of Government, Public and Family Affairs Jamie Finch weighs in on why the FAA has taken over the certifying process for all new Boeing 737 Max aircraft.

Transportation Workers Demand Bill

Transportation workers are demanding a bill to prevent another “catastrophe” like the two Boeing 737 Max crashes, which killed hundreds of people and led to the worldwide grounding of the aircraft. Former NTSB director of Government, Public and Family Affairs shares his expertise

Flight attendants to Boeing: Hell no to 737 MAX!

American Airlines’ flight attendants union is demanding an active role in any decision to put Boeing 737 MAX aircraft back in service, and its members “refuse to walk onto a plane that may not be safe.” This comes amid intense new scrutiny on Boeing, including a damning congressional testimony. RT America’s Michele Greenstein reports. Then former NTSB Director of Government, Public and Family Affairs Jamie Finch joins Rick Sanchez to share his expertise.

Former NTSB Director of Public and Family Affairs Jamie Finch joins to share his insights on Boeing’s legal woes.

Former NTSB Director of Public and Family Affairs Jamie Finch discusses the Air National Guard base at Truax Field that will affect the surrounding lower-income community.

Former director of Government, Public and Family Affairs at the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Jamie Finch joins Rick Sanchez to discuss the FAA’s plan to allow airplane seats to be made even smaller.

The European Union’s aviation regulator is worried changes made to the Boeing 737 Max 8 jet’s new software aren’t enough. Meanwhile, a former Ethiopian Airlines engineer claims Boeing has a pattern of corruption, including fabricating documents. Former National Transportation Safety Board official Jamie Finch shares his insights.

Jamie Finch, former director of Government, Family and Planning Affairs at the NTSB, discusses the result of a federal investigation into aircraft manufacturing giant Boeing.

Indonesia will be the first government to formally blame Boeing for the deadly malfunction on the Max 8 jet that killed more than 300 people aboard a Lion Air flight in October 2018. Indonesian investigators will submit their report to the NTSB and FAA for review. Former NTSB official Jamie Finch discusses the scandal (13:31).

Int’l air safety panel to grill FAA

An international air safety panel is criticizing the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for a lack of oversight over Boeing and its certification process. The infamous Boeing 737 Max8 crashes caused more than 300 deaths. Former director of Government, Public and Family Affairs at the National Transportation Safety Board Jamie Finch joins Scottie Nell Hughes to share his expertise.

Problematic 737 Max Jets SHELVED Until 2020

Holland Cooke is joined by former NTSB official Jamie Finch to break down what the suspension of Boeing’s 737 MAX flagship aircraft into 2020 means for the aviation industry. Following sweeping concerns about the plane’s autopilot feature which contributed to the Ethiopian Airline and Lion Air tragedies, will pilots and passengers EVER be able to trust Boeing’s aircraft again?

Former director for the Office of Government, Public, and Family Affairs at the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) joins Rick Sanchez to share his insights on the investigation into Boeing and its doomed 737 Max8 project.

Why are 3,000 pilots suing Boeing?

Boeing and their battle with the FAA over their 737 Max 8 planes

FAA proposals ‘don’t pass the smell test’

Airlines’ resumption of selling flights aboard the infamous 737 Max 8 aircraft

Boeing crashing & burning: Record losses

Passengers saying ‘no’ to flying Boeing planes

Flight cancellations soaring, Boeing to blame

Boeing is working on a deal to sell 200 Boeing 737 Max 8 planes to International Consolidated Airlines Group

FAA discovers Boeing programming flaw

Boeing’s ‘bad luck’ and supplier errors – aviation safety advocate

Boeing 737 Max 8 grounded for 10 more weeks

Boeing latest: FAA grilled by House Transportation Cmte

Shocker: Boeing knew of faulty 737s in 2017

Plenty of blame to go around’ for Boeing crashes

Boeing’s Sway at FAA

FAA ‘dropped ball’ on Boeing 737 Max 8

Several Nations Ground Boeing 737 Max 8S

Boeing’s 737 Model Scandal Deepens

Boeing’s Fatal Flaw?

100th Anniversary of Republic of Latvia

Celebrating the 100th Anniversary of the establishment of the Republic of Latvia with His Excellency Mr Andris Teikmanis, Ambassador of the Republic of Latvia to the United States of America.

 

FAA Questions Boeing Safety Report

Lincoln Park Consulting Sponsors NEC Events

Lincoln Park Consulting was proud to sponsor the National Economists Club event held September 20th at the Canadian Embassy.

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Boeing Safety Warning After Lionair Crash

Lion Air Flight Crashes Off Indonesian Coast

Problems Persist for Southwest

Maryland National Horse Show

Sponsorship of Maryland National Horse Show
April 5-8, 2018
Upper Marlboro, MD

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Show Place Spring Festival Horse Show

Sponsor of Show Place Spring Festival Horse Show
March 28-31, 2018
Upper Marlboro, MD

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Southwest Airlines Faces Lawsuit

NTSB and Southwest Airlines

Congress will decide medical marijuana’s future this month

The Washington Examiner

March 5, 2018

By: Beau Rothschild

 

While many are focused on DACA and funding for the wall in the next appropriations bill to be considered by Congress before the March 23 deadline, another issue that will also be litigated is the future of states that have allowed medical marijuana.

Since 2014, Congress has included a funding rider that prevents the Justice Department from taking action against states that have allowed the use, distribution, possession or cultivation of medical marijuana. President Trump’s numerous campaign promises to uphold this freedom for states that have passed laws allowing marijuana for medical use is well documented. Yet, his own attorney general, Jeff Sessions, has gone as far as to send a letter to members of Congress demanding the funding rider be removed from law.

Sessions’ stance on the issue violates the notion of federalism and breaks Trump’s campaign promises.

The funding rider was first passed as an amendment offered by Reps. Dana Rohrabacher, R-Calif., and Samuel Farr, D-Calif., on a 242-186 vote in the House. It was made part of the appropriations “CROmibus” that was signed into law late in 2014. Rohrabacher teamed up with Rep. Earl Blumenauer after Farr left Congress to push the bipartisan amendment. The Rohrabacher-Farr Amendment was blocked by a House leadership rule preventing the amendment from being offered during last year’s appropriations process. Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., was successful in attaching the prohibition to the Senate appropriations bill for the Justice Department last year.

Multiple continuing resolutions have continued enforcement of the provision into this year, yet the final disposition on this issue is in doubt as Congress negotiates the final appropriations bill for this year before the late March deadline. It would be both a political and a policy mistake for Congress to not renew the rider.

On the political side, it is clear that medical marijuana has wide support from voters of both parties. The Washington Times reported on Apr. 18, 2017 on a Yahoo/Marist poll that pegged support for medical marijuana at 83 percent. Candidate Trump understood the will of the people, and that is why he was so vocal a supporter of medical marijuana. Not many issues poll that high, and considering that Congress had a 10 percent approval rating (14 percent approval of Congress by Republicans) according to a Facebook/Quinnipiac Poll from August of last year, they might want to support medical marijuana for political reasons.

On the policy side, it also makes sense for a Republican-controlled Congress to respect the wishes of states that have allowed medical marijuana. Federalism is a core value of the Republican party, yet the party is not abiding by the idea that the states make better decisions about governing their own populations. This is an issue that does not divide the American people, yet the Republican leadership seems to be answering to the will of Attorney General Sessions more so than the will of their own constituents.

As a loyal Republican, and a former House staffer, I want my party to succeed. I want to see Republicans do everything they can to govern consistent with the will of voters in a way that makes it more likely that they hold onto the House. That may not be the case if the Congress continually ignores the will of Americans who want to see spending under control and a government that acts consistent with the will of the people.

In our great nation, we have a separation of powers that provides Congress the “power of the purse.” Congress makes the laws, and the executive branch implements them. Congress is well within its powers to prevent the Justice Department from implementing a wrongheaded policy that will go after legal enterprises in states that are providing medical marijuana services to needy people.

The people in states that have voted for state legislators who have passed laws to allow medical marijuana need to be respected. Congress should flex some muscle to keep the Rohrabacher-Leahy amendment in place.

Beau Rothschild is Vice President of Business Development at LPC.  Prior to joining LPC, Beau served as a Chief of Staff on Capitol Hill and in senior staff positions for a number of committees,  including the Committee on House Administration and with the House Republican Conference.

Luncheon with Embassy of Republic of Kenya

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Nelson Garcia and Jamie Finch of Lincoln Park Consulting with Mr. David Gacheru, Deputy Chief of Mission, Embassy of the Republic of Kenya.

Networking Luncheon with Congressman Jack Bergman (R-Michigan)

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LPC Vice President and WIPG President, Nelson Garcia, with the Honorable Jack Bergman (R-Michigan)

Networking Reception with the Embassy of the Czech Republic

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LPC VP, Nelson Garcia, with His Excellency Hynek Kmonicek, Ambassador of the Czech Republic to the United States of America following Ambassador Kmonicek’s economic presentation at the Embassy of the Czech Republic.

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LPC VP, Nelson Garcia, moderating a presentation by Ambassador Hynek Kmonicek of the Czech Republic regarding investment and economic opportunities in the Czech Republic, and the status of trade between the Czech Republic, United States of America, and European Union.  

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LPC Partner, Jamie Finch, and LPC VP of Global and Professional Services and WIPG President, Nelson Garcia, with the Honorable Jack Bergman (R-Michigan) and other WIPG members at the WIPG hosted Networking Luncheon with Congressman Bergman at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center.

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LPC Vice President of Global and Professional Services and WIPG President, Nelson Garcia, with His Excellency Hynek Kmonicek, Ambassador of the Czech Republic to the United States of America

Why SpaceX Is The Same Oil Peddler Of The Twenty-First Century

The Federalist

January 16, 2018

By: Beau Rothschild

In the nineteenth century, Americans across the country were mesmerized by “miracle elixirs,” better known as medicine shows, which offered “cure-alls” for everything in the book. Diseases? There was a drink for that. Wrinkles? There was a magic cream for that too. These traveling shows did far more than “heal,” they entertained. Freak shows, magic tricks, and storytelling, among other fun activities, were included on the lists of offerings.

For many, these flamboyant events were awe-inspiring – that is, until the country realized these “miracle cures” were almost completely ineffective. Over time, an increasing number of Americans began referring to these big promisers as “snake oil salesmen.” By the next century, most disappeared, as did their outrageous claims.

Worrisome national security events that transpired this week have convinced some Americans that SpaceX, a rocket manufacturer and launcher for national security missions, is the magic elixir of this generation — only this time, the “magic pills” in question are not only often ineffective, they’re also affecting the country’s national security.

Akin to the once-beloved nineteenth-century miracle workers, SpaceX often tries to entertain onlookers with flashy proclamations. It has pledged nearly unfeasible feats, such as sending humans beyond the Moon by the end of the year and potentially landing spaceships on Mars by 2022 — both of which will allegedly occur on rockets that have either failed to get off the ground or have had trouble doing so. It is not without a sense of irony that the CEO of SpaceX suggested those few who decide to go to Mars may not live to tell about it.

It is hard to criticize SpaceX’s public relations strategy. After all, it is competing against some of America’s most prominent companies, so drumming up eye-popping media coverage is a must. But past and possible present operational concerns have led some to seriously question the company.

SpaceX attempted to launch a billion-dollar classified government satellite on Sunday, coined “Zuma,” for an unknown government agency. No one knows if it succeeded, but many have expressed skepticism, citing possible errors on SpaceX’s end.

There is plenty of reason for concern on the part of SpaceX, primarily because of past issues with the Zuma mission itself. Zuma was initially set to launch in November, but experienced several delays before its Jan. 7 launch. Also of note is that SpaceX’s Falcon 9, the rocket used for this mission, has massive past failures under its belt.

Regardless of mission sensitivity, the U.S. government is always expected to shed some light on issues like this one. But this time, a top Pentagon spokeswoman, perhaps a stalwart defender of SpaceX like her former boss, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), refused to comment. She told incredulous journalists to refer all inquiries to SpaceX.

Predictably, SpaceX has assured the press that everything went smoothly on its part, similar to how it casted blame on the strut obtained from an outside company during 2015’s Falcon 9 failure. It also refused to rule out the merits of pointing fingers at external forces in another Falcon 9 mishap one year later.

It would be one thing if this was a fluke misjudgment on the Pentagon’s part, but government bureaucrats seem to have a track record of hiding SpaceX’s mistakes. For example, during the 2015 Falcon 9 incident, NASA refused to release a public investigative summary, despite originally promising it would do so. Although it put out a report for a competitor’s similar commercial launch which operated under the same NASA program, it kept this SpaceX case study a public mystery.

Do certain government officials fear learning the truth? Are they so caught up in Elon Musk’s praiseworthy end-game and objectives that they are willing to cast a blind eye to these seeming problems?

Investigations typically take months to years, so it is unlikely that bureaucrats have reached an unequivocal answer already. Yet, as if nothing has happened, SpaceX has said that it will continue full-speed ahead with the launches on its agenda, including the Falcon 9 Heavy — the rocket that will allegedly fuel its quest for Mars despite 4 years of delays and a failure last month. SpaceX may also send astronauts to the International Space Station by the end of 2018.

While it is easy to grow starry-eyed and all-believing due to SpaceX’s praiseworthy intent, government officials must remain free of bias when making crucial national security decisions, especially when human lives are at stake. Perhaps it’s time for them to take a step back and let rationality kick in.

The magic elixirs of 200 years ago weren’t miracle workers, and neither is SpaceX — at least not yet. Whether SpaceX can overcome their failures remains to be seen, but it is concerning, to say the least, that American taxpayers have become the guinea pigs who will bear the risks and the costs before a final determination can be made.

SpaceX should continue working to improve — and over the past year, improve it certainly has — but not on the taxpayers’ dime. It’s time to put launches from this big dreamer on pause until it demonstrates steady, proven success.

Beau Rothschild is Vice President of Business Development at LPC.  Prior to joining LPC, Beau served as a Chief of Staff on Capitol Hill and in senior staff positions for a number of committees,  including the Committee on House Administration and with the House Republican Conference.

Amtrak crash could’ve been prevented

Ending the war on medical marijuana

The Washington Times

February 1, 2018

By: Beau Rothschild

 

It is time for the real federalists in Congress to step up and stop Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ war on medical marijuana.

Veronique de Rugy wrote recently in Reason, “the Attorney General’s reversal on marijuana is out of step with states’ rights and public opinion.” The real federalists respect the idea that “it’s the essence of liberty to let people make their own decisions as long as they’re not harming others.” States that have consented to this exercise of liberty should be respected.

Now that the government shutdown is over, and Congress is staring at a new Feb. 8, 2018 deadline to fund the government, the issue is particularly urgent. The issue that stalled the last continuing resolution was a debate over DACA and funding for a wall at the southern border. One issue percolating that could become another stumbling block for the next deadline is the issue of how the federal government will treat states that have allowed medical marijuana.

With every continuing resolution, Congress has continued a funding rider that has run with appropriations bills since 2014 that allow 29 states and the District of Columbia to grow, use and distribute medical marijuana. These states have all changed the law to make medical marijuana lawful within the states’ borders.

The funding rider prevents the Justice Department from interfering with states that have consented to medical marijuana, yet Mr. Sessions has aggressively lobbied the House and Senate to strip that language from the final appropriations bill that is signed into law.

In the House, Reps. Dana Rohrabacher, California Republican, and Earl Blumenauer, Oregon Democrat, were blocked last year from offering their defunding amendment when the House considered the appropriations measure that funds the Justice Department. In the Senate, Sen. Patrick Leahy, Vermont Democrat, was successful in attaching the funding rider to the Senate appropriations measure.

Beau Rothschild is Vice President of Business Development at LPC.  Prior to joining LPC, Beau served as a Chief of Staff on Capitol Hill and in senior staff positions for a number of committees,  including the Committee on House Administration and with the House Republican Conference.

Bill Ackman: A case study in the dark side of lobbying

The Washington Examiner

January 14, 2018

By: Beau Rothschild

 

I worked on Capitol Hill for years and now am working in the private sector. As a staffer, I interacted with lobbyists on a daily basis. Many times, they came in to lobby for help in reducing regulations, lowering taxes, or passing legislation that makes sense for markets.

There were other lobbying meetings I had that gave me a bad feeling in the pit of my stomach, because these lobbyists came into the office to push for action that clearly would help their client to the detriment of other companies.

I am aware of at least one instance where this has played out in public. The case of hedge fund Pershing Square’s Bill Ackman using lobbying and public relations to pressure the federal government to put a business into bankruptcy. His public position is that he is an “activist investor” who is trying to do some good by pushing a sports nutrition company, Herbalife, which he believes has a flawed business model, out of business. Ackman has put a large amount of money behind this push.

In December 2012, Ackman’s hedge fund had shorted Herbalife to the tune of $1 billion. That set off an epic battle in which Ackman tried to persuade investors to stay away from Herbalife. He made a three-and-a-half-hour presentation lecture in a 500-seat auditorium that was webcasted that resulted in Herbalife stock dropping 10 percent in six seconds and a whopping 42 percent over a week.

But Herbalife recovered and the presentation resulted in failure. Ackman did not profit from a drop in the stock — he needed a complete crash of the company to cash in.

Ackman later bragged to the Street that he had spent $50 million “to research and publicize the fund’s negative views on Herbalife.” Some of this cash was spent on a lobbying campaign in Washington, D.C., designed to get the attention of members of Congress and to push for Federal Trade Commission and Securities and Exchange Commission investigations of Herbalife. Ackman was successful in getting the FTC to investigate Herbalife, yet that effort failed to drive the company into bankruptcy.

Once persuasion failed to kill Herbalife, Ackman had resorted to lobbyists and the government to do his dirty work. There is nothing wrong with a hedge fund shorting a stock they think is overpriced, but it’s a whole other thing to use the power of government to secure an investment strategy. I would think of Ackman’s tactics whenever I met with other lobbyists who came to my office wanting to use the government for competitive advantage.

Herbalife survived Ackman’s assault and saw its share price more or less recover. Ackman recently had to convert his short position into something called “put options.” According to Bloomberg’s report on the change from November of last year, Ackman has changed his position to make “sure he won’t lose more money if the shares keep going up.” Hopefully he and others will back way from this business of using government to get rich on their Wall Street bets.

 

Beau Rothschild is Vice President of Business Development at LPC.  Prior to joining LPC, Beau served as a Chief of Staff on Capitol Hill and in senior staff positions for a number of committees,  including the Committee on House Administration and with the House Republican Conference.

‘Multiple fatalities’ after Amtrak train derailment in Washington state

Embassy of Haiti Networking Reception

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His Excellency Paul Getty Altidor of the Republic of Haiti with WIPG President Nelson Garcia

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Embassy of Liechtenstein Networking Reception

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With His Excellency Kurt Jaeger, Ambassador of the Principality of Liechtenstein to the United States of America

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Networking Luncheon with Congressman Brian Mast (R-Florida)

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With The Honorable Brian Mast (R-Florida), son Maverick, and Andrew Gelfuso (Vice President, Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center)

Networking Luncheon with Congressman Thomas Suozzi (D-New York)

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WIPG President Nelson Garcia with Congressman Thomas Suozzi (D-New York)

Networking Briefing with the Embassy of the Republic of Kenya

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With Jamie Finch of Lincoln Park Consulting and His Excellency Robinson Njeru Githae, Ambassador of the Republic of Kenya to the United States of America

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With His Excellency Robinson Njeru Githae, Ambassador of the Republic of Kenya to the United States of America

Networking Reception with Our Children’s Vision and the Embassy of the Commonwealth of Australia

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LPC VP of Global and Professional Services and WIPG President, Nelson Garcia, makes opening introductory remarks at the WIPG organized Networking Reception with Our Children’s Vision and the Embassy of the Commonwealth of Australia.

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Attendees socialize and network before and after the presentations by Our Children’s Vision and by the cultural affairs officer of the Embassy of the Commonwealth of Australia, Dana Robertson.

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Professor Kovin Naidoo of Our Children’s Vision addresses the audience.

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LPC Partner, Jamie Finch, discusses with Professor Naidoo the devistating economic effects stemming from poor vision that can be corrected  with something as simple as a pair of glasses.

 

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Music legend, Bono, is a major sponsor and voice supporting Our Children’s Vision.  Bono himself suffers from glacoma and vision issues are one of his primary charitable passions.

Networking Luncheon with the Embassy of the Republic of South Africa

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LPC VP of Global and Professional Services and WIPG President, Nelson Garcia, with His Excellency Mninwa Johannes Mahlangu, Ambassador of South Africa to the United States of America.

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LPC Partner, Jamie Finch, and LPC VP of Global and Professional Services and WIPG President, Nelson Garcia, with His Excellency Mninwa Johannes Mahlangu, Ambassador of South Africa to the United States of America.   Networking Luncheon with the Embassy of the Republic of South Africa hosted by WIPG.

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Ambassador Mninwa Johannes Mahlangu of South Africa addresses the luncheon attendees.

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Attendees gather for luncheon prior to Ambassador Mahlangu’s speech.

WIPG Ambassadorial Luncheon – May 2017

His Excellency Geir Hilmar Haarde, Ambassador of the Republic of Iceland, and his wife, Madame Inga Jona Thordardottir, with Jamie Finch, Partner at LPC (left), and Nelson Garcia, VP of Global and Professional Services at LPC and President of WIPG (right).

WIPG Ambassadorial Luncheon – April 2017

 

His Excellency Pierre Clive Agius, Ambassador of the Republic of Malta to the United States of America (right), with Nelson Garcia, VP of Global and Professional Services at LPC and President of WIPG.  At the time of this event, Malta held the presidency of the European Union.

Korea should better support victims’ families U S expert

Depression, mental health issues high among airline pilots

Conflicting reports emerge over fate of downed EgyptAir flight

Germany, Spain, France respond to families affected by Germanwings crash

Enforcement of Airline Regulations in Question After Latest Crash

RT America Broadcast, March 23, 2016

FlyDubai pilot co-pilot exhausted, under pressure to work before crash

New revelations about Saturday’s fatal crash of the FlyDubai flight in the Russian city of Rostov-on-Don found that the plane’s pilot was too exhausted to fly and was under “tremendous pressure” to keep working. The report indicates a pattern of how the company treats its pilots. RT America’s Anya Parampil speaks with aviation safety expert Jamie Finch about the FlyDubai controversy and aviation safety.

For Families’ Sake, Global Aviation Community Must Create Disaster Plans

Roll Call
April 16, 2014, 5am

By Jamie Finch

The recent mystery surrounding Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 is headed towards tragedy on countless levels. It is tragic in the number of lives lost and in the rippling waves of emotional and psychological damage that has been — and will continue to be — inflicted upon the family members and loved ones of the passengers aboard Flight 370.

As recently as 1995, what’s happening now in Kuala Lumpur and Beijing could very well have taken place in the United States. In that year the United States developed a system that transformed how the government and airlines approached family assistance.

Nearly 20 years ago, Congress passed and President Bill Clinton signed into law the Aviation Disaster Family Assistance Act of 1996, followed by the Foreign Air Carrier Family Support Act of 1997. Those two laws came in the aftermath of the crash of TWA Flight 800 off the coast of Long Island in July 1996 and Korean Airlines Flight 801 in August 1997 on the island of Guam.

They sparked a cultural about-face within the aviation industry by requiring domestic air carriers and all foreign airlines with service to the United States to have clear, standardized disaster management plans in the event of an accident. These plans include specific processes for family notification, investigation progress reports, victim identification, and the cataloging and returning of personal effects. The law also named the National Transportation Safety Board as the lead authority in overseeing families’ needs and concerns in addition to the agency’s mandated investigative duties.

To their great credit, America’s domestic carriers have done a tremendous job in developing their rapid response and family assistance plans. These plans are designed to bring comfort and aid to the victims’ families in their hour of need and help to address their unimaginable pain more effectively. They have worked tirelessly with the NTSB to dramatically improve the timeliness and quality in meeting families’ and loved ones’ needs post crash and beyond.

As the former director of Government, Public and Family Affairs at the NTSB, I have lived through this before. The distressed cries for help of family members searching for the seemingly ever-evasive answers surrounding the loss of their loved ones are choked in the bewilderment and confusion caused by an aviation disaster. At the NTSB, I was a core member in the development of America’s answer in addressing family members’ needs following an aviation crash.

If the Malaysian government and Malaysia Airlines had adopted family assistance plans, philosophically and/or legally, like those developed and followed in the United States, we would most likely not see the out-of-control outrage of families being broadcast for global consumption by the mass media. There would not be protests erupting in Beijing with family members storming the Malaysian embassy there. Families would have been kept informed of the status of the investigations. Counselors, priests, imams, monks and other religious leaders would have been available to help bring comfort to loved ones. Family members would have been brought to Kuala Lumpur, free of charge, so they could be briefed on the investigation’s progress. All this would have been done in the name of doing right by those harmed and not adding to the misery already involved — no matter if the plane’s debris and passenger’s remains are ever found or not. But, alas, this statement is what would have been.

The full story of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 will be unfolding for quite some time, but this crisis should remind the global community’s governments, airlines and the aviation industry as a whole, of the importance of being prepared to address families’ needs when an aviation accident occurs. Governments must step up to meet their citizens’ demands. Airlines must be sensitive to the pain and suffering of the victims’ families and loved ones.

Now is the time, before another accident occurs, or another family member is lost, for the global aviation community and every government to follow the United States’ lead in establishing standardized disaster plans that include processes for family notification, investigation progress reports, victim identification and the cataloging and returning of personal effects. It is not only the right thing to do; it is the only thing to do.

Jamie Finch served in the Clinton administration as director of Government, Public and Family Affairs at NTSB, where he lead family assistance and communications operations for multiple aviation disasters, including TWA 800. 

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